1. Phenomenology is Wrong

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    There are two traditions within phenomenology: realist phenomenology and idealist phenomenology. The distinguishing feature is how they treat their ‘pre-bracketed’ and ‘post-bracketed’ states. In the realist case when we interpret (describe) the world we can bracket the truth of the claims epistemologically; in the idealist case we can metaphysically bracket claims.

  2. Should the social sciences be like the natural sciences?

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    25

    Should the social sciences be like the natural sciences? Wilhelm Dilthey didn’t think so; he contended that the concept of Verstehen is crucial in our interpretation of human thought and behavior. Whereas we look for explanations of phenomena in the natural sciences, Verstehen as applied to the social sciences means interpreting human behavior.

  3. What is Satire for?

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    14

    A majority of comics profess to solely be interested in getting a laugh. Something about that just doesn’t sit well with me.

  4. Philosophy and Comedy

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    William James said of philosophy, “It sees the familiar as if it were strange, and the strange as if it were familiar.” The comedian evokes laughter by making the familiar seem strange, but the philosopher’s way of unsettling us can please in a similar way.

  5. Science, Technology and Society IV: Paul Feyerabend

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    The philosopher of science Paul Feyerabend (1924 – 1994) argued that the standard account of science as an orderly, rational, methodical process is a “fairy tale.” In practice, science is a messy business, and this messiness is essential to creativity.

  6. The event(s) of September 11

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    Two years after 9/11, several New Yorkers packed into a courtroom in order to hear a court case on the semantics of the word occurrence. The question was this: Was the attack on One and Two World Trade Center one event or two?

  7. Against Debate

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    Why the typical model of public argumentation, where two adversaries square off, is not the best model for philosophy and not good for our podcast.

  8. Murder and Ideology: philosophers have only interpreted the world; the point is to change it.

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    In the ordinary business of science it is reasonable to claim that the moon causes the tides, and to refer to empirical data as evidence. In the ordinary business of literary criticism it is reasonable to claim that Gordon Geko was greedy or that house elves are moral stand-ins for the peoples of our world who are enslaved and oppressed – and to refer to various theories of literature,…Read more »