Other (i.e. Lesser) Podcasts

Apr 122014
 
"Modern Day Philosophers": Reading Wikipedia with Comedians

I was recently alerted to the existence of an up-and-coming podcast that just started last summer called Modern Day Philosophers. Hmmmm, is that like the New Books in Philosophy podcast, bringing to light the work of under-appreciated academics? No, as you can see by the guest list: These are for the most parts established comedians Read more…

Mar 262014
 
Berkeley Discussed on BBC's "In Our Time"

A few listeners have pointed us at Melvyn Bragg’s recent podcast on Berkeley (listen to it here). It starts off with the oft-cited anecdote about Samuel Johnson claiming to have refuted Berkeley by kicking a stone: obviously, such a stone that I can kick is not an “idea in my head.” As should have been Read more…

Nov 192013
 
What Can Regular Words Do?

Question: What do Ludwig Wittgenstein, this sentence, and shooting your neighbor’s donkey have in common? Well, not much really—unless you listen to In Our Time’s excellent (not PEL-excellent, but pretty close) introduction to Ordinary Language Philosophy.

Sep 232013
 
Robert Skidelsky on Work

Robert Skidelsky in How Much is Enough?: Money and the Good Life (2012) uses a 1930 essay from John Maynard Keynes (which you can read here) as a jumping-off point to argue, like Bergmann, that productivity gains enabled by past technological advances make it totally reasonable that we now should be working fewer hours than Read more…

Jul 032013
 
"Very Bad Wizards" Podcast on Free Will

A point neglected in the moral discussion in our recent episode is free will. She-who-will-not-be-named (read her view here) on the one hand insists on the supremacy of empirical science but on the other hand insists that our freedom and hence moral responsibility is obvious and inescapable. So that should make her a compatibilist, but Read more…

May 172013
 
On Daniel Coffeen, Rhetoric, Deleuze and Such

[editors note:  Daniel was our guest on the Deleuze episode recently and will be posting a bit in our blog over the next couple of weeks] Since I discovered Deleuze in grad school, he has pervaded in various ways my teaching, writing and thinking. My dissertation proffered a model of rhetoric and specifically the trope; Read more…

Mar 222013
 
Mark Pitches Philosophy to Clergy

In our “Why Do Philosophy?” episode, we give a sales pitch for philosophy: for being interested in reading this stuff (and what makes it appeal to us more than popular science or history or literature, though those are all great too). I recently got the chance to make this pitch to an audience of liberal Read more…

Feb 202013
 
Other Podcasts on Buber

Here’s my report on what I listened to in preparation for our episode. -Rabbi Joshua Haberman held a retreat in 2008, seemingly for a bunch of other Rabbis, but I’m not clear on this, and so gave four interactive lectures on Buber that provided a lot of the background I was drawing on. (Itunes link; Read more…

Feb 052013
 

I referred in the episode to a number of lectures on Marx that helped me to put the German Ideology into perspective with Marx’s other texts and filled me in on few of the Young Hegelians that he criticized. These were from Yale’s Foundations of Modern Social Theory course by Iván Szelényi. (Get them from Read more…

Feb 022013
 
More on Marx? (on Diet Soap and Elsewhere)

[Editor's Note: Thanks for Doug Lain of the Diet Soap Podcast for weighing in here with his extensive experience with Marxism.] Mark, Seth and Wes finally arrived at the philosopher who matters most over at the pinko podcast Diet Soap.  While I plan on writing a response to their comments, and most especially to respond Read more…

Jan 282013
 
Jeffrie G. Murphy (Cruel & Unusual Podcast) on Rationales for Punishment

Our Gorgias episode, included Plato’s claim that the purpose of punishment is reformative, i.e. to build character, either in the punished (reformation) or in observers (deterrence). That someone who does injustice should not then be rewarded for it is on Plato’s account the natural order of things, true by definition, as it were, and is Read more…

Jan 032013
 
Eliezer Yudkowsky and Luke Muehlhauser on Modern Rationalism (Conversations from the Pale Blue Dot)

I’m generally skeptical when someone proclaims that “rationality” itself should get us to throw out 90%+ of philosophy. So I was a bit puzzled when someone on our Facebook group pointed at some articles by Luke Muehlhauser (specifically “Philosophy: A Diseased Discipline” and “Train Philosophers with Pearl and Kahneman, not Plato and Kant“), host of Read more…

Nov 252012
 
Theologians on Quine

In our Quine episode, I mentioned a religious podcast where the participants used Quine’s undermining of verificationism to argue that any secular-based knowledge is groundless, and thus that we need revelation in order to have knowledge at all. The podcast in question was this Philosophy for Theologians episode on “Two Dogmas of Empiricism.” (I’ve blogged Read more…

Nov 022012
 
Mary Webster on Paul Revere Radio

As part of the run-up to our Federalist Papers episode, I listened to this interview on the Paul Revere Radio podcast interviewing Mary E. Webster, who published a couple of volumes of The Federalist Papers in “modern English.” I can think of few texts with which this podcast is in contact which is less in Read more…

Oct 132012
 
Better Philosophy through Science Fiction?

For your weekend podcast-listening pleasure, a friend of the podcast pointed me to the most recent episode of the Rationally Speaking podcast in which the hosts take up science fiction and chew on what kinds of philosophical insight might garnered from such speculative fiction. (Beware those who, like Seth, abhor the thought experiment!) In the Read more…

Sep 202012
 
Martin Evans on "Candide"

A Stanford course on iTunes U, “Literature in Crisis,” includes two lectures on Candide: here and here. These are by Martin Evans, Chair of the English Department. As a literature guy, he has a bit to say about satire: why it flourished in this age in particular (because of the relative peace and stability, which Read more…

Sep 082012
 
Seth's Interview with Dan Mullin

Dan Mullin is a philosophy grad student and part-time teacher who runs a blog called The Unemployed Philosopher’s Blog.  His mission statement is to challenge the view that a philosophical education isn’t of much value for employment.  As he says:  My name is Daniel Mullin and I’m a philosophy grad student and part-time teacher. The other Read more…

Sep 072012
 
Theistic Objectivism (more on Dallas Willard)

This post is a follow-up on my Dallas Willard post from a few days ago. A couple of reader comments on that (on the blog and Facebook) shamed me into re-listening to the second half of Willard’s lecture and newly listen to the Q&A afterwards. I can now say that his positive story is not Read more…

Sep 032012
 

Here’s another Nietzsche lecture, from Stanford’s Veritas forum, which you can listen to as a podcast (iTunes link) or watch a video: Watch it on Vimeo. Dallas Willard is an unapologetic Christian, and pursues a post-modern tack similar to the one I cited in my review of the Philosophy for Theologians podcast: Modern philosophy tried Read more…

Sep 012012
 
Andrew Mitchell (Entitled Opinions) on Nietzsche's Zarathustra

We’ve done two Nietzsche episodes (here and here), yet neither of them has been on Thus Spoke Zarathustra, which is arguably Nietzsche’s most famous work, and certainly one of his most fun to read. Well, Robert Harrison’s Entitled Opinions podcast out of Stanford has filled that gap, with a great, long interview with Andrew Mitchell Read more…