Episode 122: Augustine on Mind and Metaphysics (Part Two)

AUGUSTINE

Concluding on The Confessions (400 CE), books 10–13. More on memory and how it relates to Plato’s “recollection,” Augustine’s take on will (Do we pursue something we take to be the good per Plato or do we intentionally pursue evil?), what it meeans to live as hooked up with God, and the kinds of answers Augustine gives to tricky questions like the origin of the universe and the nature of time.

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Episode 122: Augustine on Mind and Metaphysics (Part One)

AUGUSTINE

Yet more on The Confessions, now on books 10–13.

What is memory and how does it relate to time and being? Augustine thinks that memory is a storehouse, but it contains not just the sensations we put in it, but also (à la Plato’s theory of recollection) all legitimate knowledge. It’s our route to God, to real Being. Mark, Wes, and Dylan also discuss time, language, knowledge, the existence of evil, and more.

Attend the Aftershow on Sun., 9/6 at 3pm!

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Episode 121: Augustine on Being Good (Part One)

AUGUSTINE

On The Confessions (400 CE), books 1–9. The question is not “What is virtue?” because knowing what virtue is isn’t enough. The problem, for Aurelius Augustinus, aka St. Augustine of Hippo, is doing what you know to be right.

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Episode 120: A History of “Will” with Guest Eva Brann (Part Two)

Brann

Continuing our dicussion of Un-Willing with the author. We explore and critique Eva’s picture of the less-willfull life and try to figure out how her historically driven account relates to modern debates about free will. Listen to part one first.

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Episode 120: A History of “Will” with Guest Eva Brann (Part One)

Brann

We discuss Un-Willing: An Inquiry into the Rise of Will’’s Power and an Attempt to Undo It (2014) with the author, covering Socrates, Augustine, Aquinas, Heidegger, Nietzsche, Sartre, compatibilism, the neurologists’ critque of free will, and more.

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Episode 119: Nietzsche on Tragedy and the Psychology of Art (Part Three)

Friedrich Niezsche

Pt 3 of 3 on Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy on the evils according to Nietzsche of “Socratism,” i.e. scientific optimism: Everything useful, beautiful, and good must be reasonable, fodder for scientific investigation. Why would Greek tragedy show us that this Enlightenment ideal is somehow misguided?

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Listen to parts one and two.

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Episode 119: Nietzsche on Tragedy and the Psychology of Art (Part One)

On Friedrich Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy (1872). Nietzsche thought that you could tell how vital or decadent a civilization was by its art, and said that ancient Greek tragedy was so great because it was a perfect synthesis of something highly formal/orderly/beautiful with the intuitive/unconscious/chaotic. But then Socrates ruined everything!

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Episode 119: Nietzsche on Tragedy and the Psychology of Art (Citizen Edition)

Friedrich Niezsche

On Friedrich Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy (1872), which was his first book. Nietzsche thought that you could tell how vital or decadent a civilization was by its art, and said that ancient Greek tragedy was so great because it was a perfect synthesis of something highly formal/orderly/beautiful with the intuitive/unconscious/chaotic. But then Socrates ruined everything, and it remains ruined! Can we recapture the magic? Probably not. With guest John Castro.

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End song: “Some Act” by Mark Lint and the Fake from “So Whaddaya Think?” (2000)